A4NH/IFPRI Gender Seminar: Gender, Agriculture, and Health: Tracing the Links

UPDATE: Recording of the screencast and presentations are now available on Slideshare.

The CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) and the IFPRI Gender Task Force invite you to:

Gender, Agriculture, and Health: Tracing the Links

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Three 15-minute presentations from:

Kelly Jones on livelihood shocks and sexual health

Research Fellow, Markets, Trade, and Institutions Division, IFPRI

Elizabeth Bryan on irrigation, gender, and health

Senior Research Analyst, Environment Production and Technology Division, IFPRI

Delia Grace on gender-sensitive participatory risk assessment for food safety

Program Manager, Food Safety and Zoonoses, ILRI and A4NH

Chair: Hazel Malapit

Research Coordinator, A4NH and IFPRI Poverty, Health, Nutrition Division

October 20, 2015

9:30am-10:30am

IFPRI Conference Room 6A

Please find instructions for joining virtually at the end of this message.

How can we take into account health in our agriculture, nutrition, and gender research? Health and nutrition are closely interrelated: health status influences nutritional outcomes, by mediating a person’s ability to utilize nutrients and lead a healthy life, and nutritional status influences health, by mediating a person’s vulnerability to various illnesses. Both health and nutrition are directly and indirectly affected by rural livelihood decisions related to agriculture, livestock, and water management. Livelihood decisions and duties are gendered, in that social identity influences an individual’s options and choices. Men and women’s exposure to health risks, capacity to provide health care, and access to health services often vary due to these differing roles and rights.

This seminar provides three case studies in how gender dynamics in rural livelihoods influence health, and in turn, nutrition. Intended as an introduction to topics in gender, health, and agriculture, the seminar will help researchers familiar with the agriculture-to-nutrition pathways begin to think about how health has bearings on this framework.

In the seminar, Kelly Jones will present on recent research that traces how livelihood shocks may increase HIV transmission through higher-risk sex, especially for women. Elizabeth Bryan will share early-stage research on the links between small-scale irrigation adoption, gender, and health and nutrition outcomes. Delia Grace will introduce a gender-sensitive participatory risk assessment framework for addressing food safety.

We hope you can join this special Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) and the IFPRI Gender Task Force seminar in person at IFPRI or online via GoToMeeting (instructions below).

Working on gender and nutrition in agriculture? Join the conversation at the A4NH Gender-Nutrition Idea Exchange.

Visit gender.ifpri.info to learn more about gender research at IFPRI.

Instructions for joining virtually via GoToMeeting:

 Please join my meeting.

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/855073413

  1. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended.  Or, call in using your telephone.

Dial +1 (571) 317-3122

Access Code: 855-073-413

Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting

Meeting ID: 855-073-413

Trackbacks

  1. […] how health has bearings on the gender-agriculture-nutrition framework, A4NH organized a seminar on Agriculture, Gender, and Health: Tracing the Links on October 20, 2015. The seminar provided three case studies in how gender dynamics in rural […]

  2. […] how health has bearings on the gender-agriculture-nutrition framework, A4NH organized a seminar on Agriculture, Gender, and Health: Tracing the Links on October 20, 2015. The seminar provided three case studies in how gender dynamics in rural […]

  3. […] the gender-agriculture-nutrition framework. This series is based on a seminar organized by A4NH on Agriculture, Gender, and Health: Tracing the Links on October 20, 2015 which provided three case studies on how gender dynamics in rural livelihoods […]

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